WATERSIDE Part 2
END OF AN ERA


1860...
With the American Civil War came the Cotton Famine, and supplies of raw cotton were cut off. There was no work and no pay. Great hardship hit the cotton industry and people depended on charity, soup kitchens and on Glossop Famine Relief Committee. The war ended and though work was resumed, the new generation of the Sidebottom family spent less time at the Mill, and overseas competition meant that orders dwindled.
1899...
The final blow came when a huge fire destroyed Bridge Mill. The remaining family members sold off what was left of Waterside. John Garside & Co bought the mill and revitalized the mills with automatic looms, new engines and electric lights. They revived the business with modern fabrics, man-made fibres.
1914-18...
During the First World War the mill was taken over by the Greenfield Mill Company producing Gun-cotton.
1941...
Maconochies Foodstuffs Ltd came to Waterside having been bombed out of their London factory in the Blitz. They made the famous Pan Yan Pickle, Spam and Tinned Meat & Veg. Later as Rowntrees, products included Gales Honey, SunPat Peanut Butter, Custard Powder and Cocoa. Locals could tell what they were producing by the distinct aroma.
1939-45...
During the Second World War, Waterside Mill produced fabric for parachutes and barrage balloons. When the war ended, textile production resumed, but with a smaller workforce, 1968 Saw a merger with English Sewing Cotton. In 1976 production was moved to a mill in Bolton.
1976...
After over 200 years of textile production having provided work for tens of thousands, Waterside Mill finally closed. This site has been redeveloped and is now Hadfield Trading Estate, occupied by many separate companies.




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